Tag: Tourism

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From its inception, reggae music has characteristically been associated with Rastafarians, the tropics, and spliffs sending up plumes of cannabis smoke. Acknowledging this everlasting connection to music, Clyde McKenzie, organiser of the upcoming Reggae Sumfest symposium, wishes to propel conversations that inextricably align cannabis use with reggae music.

Along with topics such as the technical art of sound engineering and the correlation between music and violence, McKenzie has organised for a panel to open a discussion on music and herb on July 12 at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge at The UWI Mona Campus, during the symposium.

Regardless of the fact that many places around the world, including Uruguay and Canada, have recently embraced cannabis as both medicine and recreation, Jamaica is still tiptoeing towards accepting the product as viable in business and in health. But there is another connection that is well known, but perhaps undermined for its not-so-pretty history as a criminal element.

“There is a historical nexus between the plant and Jamaican music. Many of our leading exponents have really promoted or recommended the use of ganja in their music. The fact is that the Rastafarian movement is significant to our cultural music, as is their sacramental plant,” McKenzie told The Sunday Gleaner.

“The question we’re asking is how do we continue the synergy between ganja and Jamaican music; what can be derived from continued associations between the two; and what should be the nature of this relationship. How will the businesses that are marijuana-related invest? Will they use Jamaican music to promote it? Or how will they invest in Jamaican music?” he questioned.

To continue pushing the conversation, local music festivals like Rebel Salute and Reggae Sumfest have either dedicated features to the event (like Salute’s Herb Curb) or inviting the participation of advocates, activists and the few licensed entities that exist.

GAME CHANGER
Since Jamaica began issuing licences to select growers who are developing medical and recreational dispensaries, a variety of players entered the fledgling industry. According to Joe Bogdanovich, some of those players will be represented at Reggae Sumfest.

“It’s a really significant industry, maybe a game changer industry, maybe in more ways than we actually know. I’ll say it’s all positive and constructive. It’s an industry that we recognise at Reggae Sumfest,” he told The Sunday Gleaner.

“Here in the island of Jamaica, it’s a situation where there are a lot of medical marijuana applications. From my understanding, it’s much more significant than just the other kind of marijuana. We do understand that it helps cancer patients, with dietary problems and all sorts of things,” Bogdanovich observed.

For the Sumfest principal, his position about the shifting global attitude to cannabis primarily aligns with medicine. However, the historical nexus, McKenzie highlighted, is not lost on the popular entrepreneur.

He added: “Marijuana was a common thing, back in the Peace Movement in them’60s that was revolutionary at that time. It’s something that comes all the way from Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, and all of those people. This is just the continuation, an evolution of business.”

So far, Bogdanovich has secured the support of RAGGA (Rastafari Grassroots and Ganja Cluster), a group representing all the mansions of Rastafari at next month’s staging of Reggae Sumfest.

“RAGGA is one such licensed organisation and they’re definitely on board. Island Strains is on board, and a few others brands want to get on board, but they’re not totally approved as of yet. We’re working on getting that done,” he revealed.

Among the other topics to be explored at the July 12 Reggae Symposium, are the relevance of radio in the advent of social media and the question of appropriation or misappropriation. Totally free to the public, the symposium only requires online registration via Reggae Sumfest’s website. Thee organisers say that space is limited and refreshment will be provided.

Reggae Sumfest kicks off on July 14 with ‘Morning Medz’, a breakfast party at Tropical Beach. On Monday, July 15, the festival will take to the streets with a Street Dance at the Old Hospital Park. The action moves to Pier 1 on Tuesday, July 16, with the All-White Party. It’s all black on Wednesday, July 17, when the party moves to the Hard Rock Café in Montego Bay. The Global Sound Clash takes place on Thursday, July 18, at Pier 1, and this will see top selectors Ricky Trooper, Pink Panther, Yard Beat, and King Turbo competing for honours.

The performances begin at the Catherine Hall Entertainment Centre on Friday, July 19. Among the artistes who are now in rehearsals for Reggae Sumfest Night 1 are Chronixx, Beenie Man, Bounty Killer, Spice, Agent Sasco, Dexta Daps, Squash Spragga Benz, Elephant Man, Munga, Govanna, and Dovey Magnum.

The curtains come down on Reggae Sumfest on Saturday, July 20, with heavyweights Buju Banton, and Beres Hammond as well as Protojé, Romain Virgo, Chris Martin, Dalton Harris, Jah9 and Etana.

http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/entertainment/20190630/game-changing-ganja-reggae-sumfest

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Chronic Law Drops Feel-Good Single “Live Life”
by J.D. Smith  June 26, 2019
Chronic Law drops a new track “Live Life” listen to it below.

Here we go again another Chronic Law another BIG SONG. “Live Life” his new track outlines the changes his life has gone through over the years. “But my life change up perfect, Nuffa dem seh mi aguh dead early, Nuffbwoy mi see hype and when dem reach up high dem drop like bird sh*t.” This track distributed by Johnny Wonder’s 21st habilos distribution is primed for DJ decks this summer. Another one in the theme of summer happiness has entered the dancehall sphere.

Chronic Law is one of the new breakout acts in dancehall this year. He is aligned with the new 6ixx crew headed by Squash. Law will be taking the stage at Reggae Sumfest in July when the 6ixx crew is expected to close Dancehall Night.

Gwaan do it Law Boss, Live Life!

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Kingston Experiencing Tourism Renaissance
JIS FEATURES
JUNE 21, 2019
WRITTEN BY: GARWIN DAVIS

Story Highlights
Although Kingston is officially listed by the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) as one of the island’s six resort areas, the city has not always enjoyed first-call status it relates to tourist arrivals.
This, however, seems to be rapidly changing, as the nation’s capital has been gaining traction as a cultural and musical destination, and is now being given a second look by travellers, mainly the millennials.
Investors have been taking note of the upward tick in visitor arrivals, and are seeking to exploit this positive development.
Although Kingston is officially listed by the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) as one of the island’s six resort areas, the city has not always enjoyed first-call status it relates to tourist arrivals.

This, however, seems to be rapidly changing, as the nation’s capital has been gaining traction as a cultural and musical destination, and is now being given a second look by travellers, mainly the millennials.

Investors have been taking note of the upward tick in visitor arrivals, and are seeking to exploit this positive development.

Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says he is not surprised by the renewed interest in Kingston, noting that “this can only further add value to what is an already very attractive tourism product”.

He tells JIS News that the development of the AC Marriott Kingston Hotel and the R Hotel is not only a major boost for the city’s tourism offerings, but will assist in showcasing the metropolis as a viable alternative to the island’s northern and southern coasts.

“Jamaica’s tourism product is getting more diverse by the day. Our arrival figures are now at a stratospheric level where, for the first time in history, we welcomed some two million visitors in the first five months of the year and earned US$1.7 billion in revenue,” he notes.

Mr. Bartlett adds that he expects the boutique R Hotel in New Kingston and also the AC Marriott to not only increase Kingston’s rooms but also play a part in attracting more visitors to Jamaica.

“The presence of products like these adds to the statement that Kingston wants to make… that it has arrived and is ready for the status of a big city tourism destination. So we are also excited about building out these very important elements of what true city tourism is about,” he further says.

The AC Marriott, designed by Synergy Design Studios, is a Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart-led Sandals Resorts International development located on Lady Musgrave Road in the New Kingston/Golden Triangle area, and adjoins the family-owned ATL Automotive Group’s BMW and MINI showroom.

Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett (centre), joins Sandals/ATL Group Deputy Chairman, Adam Stewart (right); and Senior Communications Strategist in the Tourism Ministry, Delano Seiveright, in raising a toast to the development of the newly constructed AC Marriott Kingston Hotel, during a recent tour of the establishment.
The hotel represents the family’s first major tourism venture outside of its Sandals/Beaches resorts brand.“The AC Marriot in Kingston is very special. It is not just a facility that enables people to walk in, sleep at night or have a drink. It is a place for recreation, rest and conversation. But more importantly, it is also a creative centre where people will get a chance to enjoy the culture while making a contribution to local development,” Mr. Bartlett arguesAdditionally, the Minister says he is equally impressed with what the R Hotel brings to the table, noting that it represents the new drive in Jamaica to not only increase numbers, but also add value to the experiences of visitors to the island.He praises the owners for outfitting the hotel with Jamaica-made furnishing and promoting local culture and food through the establishment’s Gene Pearson Gallery and Red Bones Blues Café.
“This is an exciting part of this retention strategy that we have, because when the supplies that the tourist consumes are bought and produced in Jamaica, then the dollar remains here. This has resulted in an increase in retention from 30 per cent to 40.8 per cent,” the Minister points out.

For his part, R Hotel Director, Joe Bogdanovich, says with the establishment’s opening comes new possibilities for the expansion of Brand Jamaica through business tourism in the capital.

“Kingston has enormous potential for both business and conventional tourism, and we in the industry must continue to innovate in order to make Kingston the premier city to conduct business in the Caribbean,” he points out.

Senior Advisor/Strategist in the Ministry of Tourism, Delano Seiveright, notes that “the development comes on the heels of other major tourism developments in Kingston, including the… 220-room AC Marriott Kingston Hotel and the 2020 opening announcement of the new 168-room Tapestry Collection by Hilton hotel on PanJam Investment Limited’s multipurpose complex on the downtown Kingston waterfront”.

R Hotel is the city’s first extended-stay business hotel. The newest addition to Kingston’s room stock is a collaboration between noted architect Evan Williams and entertainment mogul/investor Joe Bogdanovich.

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Published:Sunday | June 23, 2019 | 12:16 AMSade Gardner – Gleaner Writer
Ian Allen

Elephant Man is a music junkie, period.

A saunter through his mansion in Havendale, St Andrew, revealed stereos blasting local radio station ZIP 103FM near the poolside while music from a flatscreen TV filled the halls of the main floor.

Ele himself is a walking music library. For almost every life experience he recalled, he trailed off in a beat, thumping his chest, snapping his fingers, and deejaying his best impersonation of Bounty Killer, Shabba Ranks, Beenie Man, Mad Cobra, Simpleton et al, with joy in his eyes and gratification on his face.

He attained no formal training for a talent that would earn him scores of chart-topping singles. Instead, the Seaview Gardens-bred artiste honed his craft by toasting among friends and isolating himself in a room with Celine Dion on repeat, as he taught himself to reach challenging notes.

“Musically, mi did always know a waa gwaan. My house did deh two gate from Shabba Ranks’ house. Bounty Killer live bout five minutes up the road. Ninjaman never come from Seaview, but anytime him come, we run up the road and look pon him from head to toe cause a our god that. We learn from them man deh, even Supercat. Dem tek music serious and nuh play round wid performance,” Ele told The Sunday Gleaner.

‘We’ included childhood friends Nitty Kutchie and Boom Dandimite, with whom he would later form Scare Dem Crew, with Harry Toddler from Waltham Park Road, Kingston.

Though he had an endorsement from Bounty (he even got a gig cutting grass for his mother, Miss Ivy), Ele’s mother did not approve of his musical ambitions.

Given name Oneil Bryan, the Norman Manley High School student earned his moniker through his ‘Dumbo’ nickname derived from his sizable ears. First deejaying on ‘Vietnam corner’ in Phase One, the 16-year-old took his skills to the neighbouring Waterhouse community at King Jammys studio, where things took a new turn.

“Jammys and everybody start record Killer, and Killer seh him buss, but him friend dem still deh deh. We seh come mek we start Scare Dem Crew cause we nah go buss solo,” he said. “Killer used to call we out pon shows, and a so we start get recognised.”

Ele fashioned the idea of members dyeing their hair to distinguish themselves from other crews, and Toddler was game. Kutchie kept his hair black, but Dandimite later got on board. With tracks like Many Many, Nuh Dress Like Girl, and Girls Every Day, the group bore success before disbanding in 1999.

BIGGEST RECORD
Dancehall was on a new wave by the new millennium, and the following year produced Elephant Man’s solo album debut, Comin’ 4 U, on Greensleeves Records. His biggest record is the 2003 dance number Pon De River, Pon De Bank, which spearheads a slew of dance hits like Signal the Plane, Blase, Scooby Doo, and Fan Dem Off complementing earlier tracks Online and Log On.

His catalogue supports his affinity for music, with a range of sampled works like Bad Man a Bad Man, remixed from R. Kelly’s The World’s Greatest; Willie Bounce, sampled from Gloria Gaynor’s I Will Survive, and Bun Bad Mind, a take on the gospel single Hear My Cry Oh Lord by Marvia Providence.

His star factor was supported by his signature lisp, spirited performances, and variegated outfits, and it did not take long for international acts to notice. His collaborative projects boast names like Janet Jackson, Busta Rhymes, Mariah Carey, Lil’ Jon, and Kat Deluna. He also did a stint at P Diddy’s Bad Boy Records, which released his Grammy-nominated album, Let’s Get Physica l, in 2008.

Growing fame accompanied some bumps in the road. Father to 20 children, Elephant Man’s personal life has been blasted in the media, with claims that he is not an active father. Then there were the court cases, a repossessed car, and other rumours swirled. “We’ve been through it. When you’re a likkle youth coming from nothing to something, people a go talk things, but at the end of the day, never mek a rumour be true,” he said. “Me take care of my kids, but sometimes you and the mother have a dispute, and you know how that go. Memba mi deh ya good one time and dem seh Ele have AIDS. Me seh, weh dat come from? Mi nuh dead, mi deh ya. That’s how people is. Me stay strong cause the fittest of the fittest shall live, and God nuh waan no weakness inna Him camp.”

Now 42 years old, he recently completed a European tour and is getting ready for festivals like Reggae Sumfest and Reggae Rotterdam in July. He still assesses the dance circuit and gives kudos to artistes like Ding Dong and Chi Ching Ching for continuing to spread Jamaica’s dance culture.

And for that little kid or music fanatic who happens to stumble across the history books of the entertainer’s life, he hopes to be immortalised as “that hard-working dancehall artiste who took dancehall to that level like the Reggae Boyz. Just like yuh can pick out the footballers who did certain things, when it comes to dancehall, you should be able to pick out Ele in the top five and say he did this or that. I’ve gotten a fair run. Me sell gold, me get Grammy-nominated, me fanbase large, and there is proof to show it.”

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With thousands of music-lovers attending reggae festivals, activists have long worried about the environmental impact. From hundreds, to hundreds of thousands of guests, festivals of every size create many forms of waste, stress the environmental infrastructure of an area, require mass amounts of energy, increase emission levels and pose potential damage to the festival site. Reggae festivals across the globe have implemented similar programs – recycling, reducing single-use plastic products, using compostable materials, providing reusable water bottles, hosting educational forums, requiring pack-in/pack-out policies, offsetting carbon emissions and more – to shrink their footprint on the environment.
( Originally printed in the “Reggae Festivals Go Green” article in Reggae Festival Guide 2019 Magazine by Jessica Farthing and Irene Johnson)
Reggae Festival Guide is thrilled to see that the world’s premier reggae festival – Reggae Sumfest, is now “Going Green” with support from the Queen of Caribbean Radio #NikkiZ Nikki Z. They recently posted this caption on their Instagram:
Go Green with Sumfest as we partner with the @RecyclingPartners and @alligatorheadfoundation for the 27th staging of this festival. 📷
Here’s how we will be playing our part:
@RecyclingPartners will be managing collection of plastics for the week of Sumfest July 14-20 to ensure that proper recycling practices are met.
@alligatorheadfoundation will be showcasing how recycled plastic can be used to create useful items facilitated by the use of a 3D printer
We and our partners will be doing at least two beach cleanups. One before the festival and one after the festival – let us know if you’d like to help
So Go Green 📷 with Sumfest this year …Recycle and Reuse. Let’s save our environment and our beautiful island 📷
Reggae Festivals are one of our favorite things in life, however, the waste that accumulates from these huge gatherings has become quite an issue. We at RFG commend Reggae Sumfest for taking the initiative to recycle + upcycle plastics and do beach cleanups. To learn more please visit reggaesumfest.com
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Ricky Trooper, Pink Panther Prepare For Sumfest’s Global Sound Clash – Local Selectors Say Winning Is A Matter Of Cultural Pride

Published:Thursday | June 20, 2019 | 2:22 PMStephanie Lyew/Gleaner Writer

Reggae and dancehall entertainers are oftentimes mentioned for having a competitive nature, whether by their attempts to surpass previous musical achievements or to outdo peers. And over the years, the platform that has thrived off that spirit of competition is the old-fashioned sound clash.
The sound clash culture remains a fundamental part of local music, reaching the global stages, says former Black Kat Sound System selector Di General Pink Panther, who is currently preparing to participate in the upcoming Reggae Sumfest Global Sound Clash, which is scheduled to take place on Thursday night, July 18, at Pier One in Montego Bay.

“Across the seas, sound clash has definitely earned its respect as more people are getting involved – no longer an underground event – its influence is strong and very present,” Pink Panther told The Gleaner.

CLASH RECORD
Before Japan’s Mighty Crown won last year’s Sumfest edition of the Irish and Chin World Clash, Pink Panther held the most titles for the event with six trophies.

“Last year, the emcee made a mistake in announcing my elimination. I was not supposed to come out of the competition but that was just because of all the confusion in voting – it was not a fair decision to me,” he said.

In addition to Pink Panther, this year’s sound clash will feature sound systems and selectors, Yard Beat from Japan, the Canada World Clash champions King Turbo, Germany’s Warrior Sound and Ricky Trooper, who is the other selector representing for Jamaica.

Like the cartoon character from which he takes his stage name, Pink Panther is expected to deliver an unpredictable set.

PINK PANTHER’S CREATIVITY
“I know most of the clashes I have done in recent years have been overseas, but I am ready with songs specifically arranged for the Reggae Sumfest audience and getting the dubs together from all the artistes people can think of to show that unique creativity Pink Panther is known for … this is a straight win,” he said.

Ricky Trooper, who was eliminated in the second round in last year’s clash, says he will be back with a bang.

“For last year, me never take the competition serious and it was cause of the personal vibes me have with Tony Matterhorn – it mess wid me concentration,” he said.

“As much as how people might think when two selectors have a personal vibes gainst one another, it will motivate them fi guh harder, it doesn’t help,” he continued.

For the 2019 staging, the St Mary-born selector says he is focused.

“I am just going there to be my best. Clash is part of my life and the more positive vibes the better,” he said. “One thing fi sure, mi nah mek the sound man dem from overseas leave with this one … it is a matter of cultural pride and pride fi mi country.”

Reggae and dancehall entertainers are oftentimes mentioned for having a competitive nature, whether by their attempts to surpass previous musical achievements or to outdo peers. And over the years, the platform that has thrived off that spirit of competition is the old-fashioned sound clash.

The sound clash culture remains a fundamental part of local music, reaching the global stages, says former Black Kat Sound System selector Di General Pink Panther, who is currently preparing to participate in the upcoming Reggae Sumfest Global Sound Clash, which is scheduled to take place on Thursday night, July 18, at Pier One in Montego Bay.

“Across the seas, sound clash has definitely earned its respect as more people are getting involved – no longer an underground event – its influence is strong and very present,” Pink Panther told The Gleaner.

CLASH RECORD
Before Japan’s Mighty Crown won last year’s Sumfest edition of the Irish and Chin World Clash, Pink Panther held the most titles for the event with six trophies.

“Last year, the emcee made a mistake in announcing my elimination. I was not supposed to come out of the competition but that was just because of all the confusion in voting – it was not a fair decision to me,” he said.

In addition to Pink Panther, this year’s sound clash will feature sound systems and selectors, Yard Beat from Japan, the Canada World Clash champions King Turbo, Germany’s Warrior Sound and Ricky Trooper, who is the other selector representing for Jamaica.

Like the cartoon character from which he takes his stage name, Pink Panther is expected to deliver an unpredictable set.

PINK PANTHER’S CREATIVITY
“I know most of the clashes I have done in recent years have been overseas, but I am ready with songs specifically arranged for the Reggae Sumfest audience and getting the dubs together from all the artistes people can think of to show that unique creativity Pink Panther is known for … this is a straight win,” he said.

Ricky Trooper, who was eliminated in the second round in last year’s clash, says he will be back with a bang.

“For last year, me never take the competition serious and it was cause of the personal vibes me have with Tony Matterhorn – it mess wid me concentration,” he said.

“As much as how people might think when two selectors have a personal vibes gainst one another, it will motivate them fi guh harder, it doesn’t help,” he continued.

For the 2019 staging, the St Mary-born selector says he is focused.

“I am just going there to be my best. Clash is part of my life and the more positive vibes the better,” he said. “One thing fi sure, mi nah mek the sound man dem from overseas leave with this one … it is a matter of cultural pride and pride fi mi country.”

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Purple-carpet affair for Sumfest Get Social Awards
by
Shereita Grizzle – Staff Reporter
June 19, 2019

Public relations specialist Tara Playfair-Scott says it’s all systems go for the inaugural staging of the Reggae Sumfest Get Social Awards.

The awards ceremony is set to take place next Saturday at Downsound Records’ headquarters on Belmont Road.

With nominees including some of the biggest names in the local music industry, as well as popular social-media personalities (local and international), the event is expected to be a star-studded affair.

Playfair-Scott told THE STAR that excitement has been steadily building and that with voting now closed, there is a heightened level of anticipation among nominees.

“We have had so many different persons telling us how excited they are that we have these awards. A lot of the nominees said they are so happy to be recognised by being nominated. We are glad to be able to recognise persons from all different fields. Plans are coming along great; we are coming down to the big day, so we are all excited,” she said.

She also revealed that the event will be streamed live on Sumfest’s Facebook page.

Interviews with the artistes will also be accommodated on the night via what she dubbed the ‘Go Live Room’.

Although many artistes are expected to be in attendance, it is still unclear if there will be any live performances on the night.

Playfair-Scott urged patrons to come out to the event as the night will be filled with surprises.

“Maybe we will have performances. You will have to be there to find out,” she said.

Nominees for the awards were announced via Sumfest’s Instagram page last month. Voting opened immediately after the announcements and closed last Friday.

Votes are currently being tallied, and the winners will be announced on June 29.

More than 100 social-media influencers were shortlisted across 35 categories including Best Male and Female Dancehall Artistes, Best DJ, Best Producer, Blogger of the Year, Kid Stars and many more.

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Reggae Sumfest Almost Ready For Jamaican Blast-Off
JIM BYERS  JUNE 17, 2019

Reggae Sumfest runs in Montego Bay, Jamaica in late July of this year.
One of the Caribbean’s hottest music parties is almost here.

This summer marks the 27th anniversary of Reggae Sumfest, Jamaica’s iconic music festival, set for Montego Bay from July 14-20, 2019. Organized by Downsound Entertainment and sponsored by the Jamaica Tourist Board, the premier music festival comes on the heels of UNESCO’s designation of reggae as an intangible cultural heritage.

Reggae Sumfest brings together reggae legends with local and mainstream acts of other popular music genres that have originated on the island and broadly influenced the chart topping urban and pop hits of today. The star-studded line-up on Festival Nights 1 & 2 will include global reggae sensation Buju Banton, dancehall veterans Beenie Man and Bounty Killer, as well as Chronixx, Spice, Spragga Benz, Elephant Man, Protégé, Beres Hammond, and more.

This year the festival offers a seven-night line-up of events:

July 14 – Mornin’ Medz Brunch Party

July 15 – Street Dance Party

July 16 – All White Party

July 17 – Blitz All Black Party / Bunji Garlin’s Birthday Celebration

July 18 – Global Sound Clash

July 19 – Festival Night 1

July 20 – Festival Night 2

“It’s been a historic year for both tourist arrivals and Reggae music, and we are thrilled to host this premier music festival again,” noted Donovan White, Jamaica’s Director of Tourism. “Reggae Sumfest continues to add unprecedented value to Jamaica, the birthplace of the music genre, as it offers one of the most authentic cultural experiences on the island for locals and visitors alike.”

As one of the most viewed festivals in the world, Reggae Sumfest will be live streamed across broadcast and other platforms, taking Jamaican music, artists, and culture to every continent and country around the world. You can view at: www.reggaesumfest.com/coming-soon/

Montego Bay, Jamaica’s resort capital, boasts an array of accommodation options for Reggae Sumfest attendees:

Boutique: S Hotel, overlooking Jamaica’s famed Doctor’s Cave beach, is a new 120-room hotel artfully combining discrete urban sophistication and a laid-back resort lifestyle. In celebration of the recent grand opening, travelers can book at special introductory rates from $179 per day.

Luxury: Half Moon Resort, an iconic property which sits on 400 acres of tropical gardens and is bordered by two miles of beach, offers 10% off the best available rate for guests who book a minimum 4-night stay at least 14 days in advance. Rates start at $222.30 per night and include roundtrip airport transfers.

All-Inclusive: The all-inclusive Holiday Inn Resort Montego Bay offers a beachfront location, comfortable rooms and unlimited dining. Rates start at $216.60 per person.

Additional taxes, service charges, blackout dates and other restrictions may apply for hotel packages.

To purchase tickets to Reggae Sumfest, visit: www.ReggaeSumfest.com. For more information about Jamaica or planning your trip, visit: www.visitjamaica.com.

For details on upcoming special events, attractions and accommodations in Jamaica go to the JTB’s website at www.visitjamaica.com.

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Jamaica’s Iconic Music Festival, Reggae SumfesttReturns for 27th Year
By South Florida Caribbean News June 3, 2019
#ReggaeSumfest Brings Stellar Line-Up to #MontegoBay July 14-22, 2019
MONTEGO BAY, Jamaica – This summer marks the 27th anniversary of Reggae Sumfest, Jamaica’s iconic music festival, set for Montego Bay from July 14-22, 2019.
Jamaica’s Iconic Music Festival, Reggae Sumfest Returns for 27th Year
 
Organized by Downsound Entertainment and sponsored by the Jamaica Tourist Board, the premier music festival comes on the heels of UNESCO’s designation of reggae as an intangible cultural heritage.
 
Reggae Sumfest brings together reggae legends with local and mainstream acts of other popular music genres that have originated on the island and broadly influenced the chart topping urban and pop hits of today.
 
The star-studded line-up on Festival Nights 1 & 2 will include global reggae sensation Buju Official, dancehall veterans Beenie Man and #BountyKiller, as well as Chronixx, Spice, Spragga Benz, #Elephantman, Protoje, Beres Hammond, and more.
 
Jamaica’s Iconic Music Festival, Reggae Sumfest Returns for 27th YearReggae Sumfest 7-night line-up of events
July 14 – Mornin’ Medz Brunch Party
July 15 – Street Dance Party
July 16 – All White Party
July 17 – Blitz All Black Party / Bunji Garlinrlin’s Birthday Celebration
July 18 – Global Sound Clash
July 19 – Festival Night 1
July 20 – Festival Night 2
“It’s been a historic year for both tourist arrivals and Reggae music, and we are thrilled to host this premier music festival again,” noted Donovan White, Jamaica’s Director of Tourism. “Reggae Sumfest continues to add unprecedented value to Jamaica, the birthplace of the music genre, as it offers one of the most authentic cultural experiences on the island for locals and visitors alike.”
 
As one of the most viewed festivals in the world, Reggae Sumfest will be live streamed across broadcast and other platforms, taking Jamaican music, artists, and culture to every continent and country around the world.
 
Hotel Accommodations for Reggae Sumfest
Montego Bay, Jamaica’s resort capital, boasts an array of accommodation options for Reggae Sumfest attendees:
 
Boutique: S Hotel, overlooking Jamaica’s famed Doctor’s Cave beach, is a new 120-room hotel artfully combining discrete urban sophistication and a laid-back resort lifestyle. In celebration of the recent grand opening, travelers can book at special introductory rates from $179 per day.
Luxury: Half Moon Resort, an iconic property which sits on 400 acres of tropical gardens and is bordered by two miles of beach, offers 10% off the best available rate for guests who book a minimum 4-night stay at least 14 days in advance. Rates start at $222.30 per night and include roundtrip airport transfers.
All-Inclusive: The all-inclusive Holiday Inn Resort Montego Bay offers a beachfront location, comfortable rooms and unlimited dining. Rates start at $216.60 per person.
Additional taxes, service charges, blackout dates and other restrictions may apply for hotel packages.
 
Click here to purchase tickets to Reggae Sumfest, and for more information about Jamaica or planning your trip, click here.
https://sflcn.com/jamaica-iconic-music-festival-reggae-sumfest-returns-27th-year/
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Reggae Sumfest

BLITZ

All-Black

Reggae Sumfest Pre-party

Bunji’s Birthday Bash!!

Wednesday,
July 17th from 7pm – Midnight

rfg
BLITZ “ALL BLACK” on July 17th at The Hard Rock Cafe in Montego Bay
is the 3rd in the series of lead-up events that plan to have
Mo’ Bay partying the week away.
Blitz is is a night of glamour, and this year
Bunji Garlin celebrates his Birthday along with his wife
Fay-Ann Lyons
on Wednesday, July 17th from 7pm-Midnight.
rfg
rfg
With Hennessy on deck, and Crazy NeilBishop Escobar and Rolexxon the wheels of steel, Blitz All Black is going to be a night to remember!
ABOUT BUNJI GARLIN
Ian Antonio Alavarez
Born in Arima, Trinidad, this multiple T&T Soca Monarch
& Ragga Soca King is a prolific lyricist.
Bunji is considered international Soca royalty.
He is affectionately known as “de girls dem darlin”
(although now married to Faye-Ann Lyons, a fellow performer)
who will also be on hand celebrating Bunji’s birthday.
 
This talented musician will be bringing the FIIIIYAH 
(you know how he says it) as he celebrates his BIRTHDAY
at Blitz this year!
 ABOUT FAY-ANN LYONS
Born in Point Fortin, Trinidad, Fay-Ann is the second generation of a Caribbean music dynasty. Daughter of “Lady Gypsy” and “Superblue,” this Caribbean Queen wears her crown well
Fay-Ann Lyons is a three-time Trinidad and Tobago Carnival Road March champion (2003, 2008, 2009) and the 2009 International Soca Monarch and International Groovy Soca Monarch champion. She created history (again) when she won the International Soca Monarch for the first time in 2009, as the first female to win the Power category, and the first individual (male or female) to win the Power, Groovy and People’s Choice awards on Fantastic Friday (aka Carnival Friday) during the finals of the competition which is held annually in Trinidad.
She also went on to win the Carnival Road March that year, becoming the first Soca artist to win that Soca ‘triplet’ of titles. She is the first (and only) woman to accomplish that feat while pregnant. Fay-Ann is the youngest solo artist (male or female), still actively recording, with multiple wins of the Carnival Road March crown.
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So put on your ALL BLACK and join us at Hard Rock 
on the beach in Montego Bay.
Reggae Sumfest WEbsite
 About Reggae Sumfest:

Sumfest has earned a reputation as the Caribbean’s premier music festival showcasing Jamaica’s indigenous music as well as many other popular global genres of music. Now in its 27th year, the world’s greatest reggae music festival continues to pay homage to the musical genre that originated in Jamaica and has become a global phenomenon. Sumfest continues to add unprecedented value to “Brand Jamaica” by promoting two of the country’s most valuable products – the music and the island itself as a tourist destination.

Since its inception, Sumfest has made Montego Bay and the surrounding areas a prime summer destination for visitors and locals alike who flock to the city to enjoy some of the best talents in Reggae, Dancehall, Hip Hop and R&B. Over the years, Sumfest has partnered with a number of major local and international brands. Our goal is to continue these long-standing partnerships and develop ways to enhance their relationship with Sumfest to drive incremental value for their brands. Sumfest is owned by Joseph Bogdanovich and produced by his company DownSound Entertainment.