Tag: Montego Bay

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Reggae Sumfest Generates $1 Billion Jamaican Dollars for the Montego Bay Area & Country!

The Team at Downsound Entertainment have definitely achieved their goals with making Reggae Sumfest a hugely attended international event! Anyone who wasn’t taking Reggae music & musicians seriously before – take note – the entire island has financially benefited from the Caribbean’s largest Reggae Festival that took place July 14-20, 2019.

Several news channels have reported this figure, which was originally projected to be around $12 Million USD, it’s now closer to $75 Million USD. The hotels, restaurants, taxi drivers and businesses around Mobay were lively with an enthusiastic crowd and the 5 Pre-Events before Festival Nights 1 & 2 helped keep everyone in an irie mood for the entire week.

As evident from the overhead drone shots, the festival was packed with locals and the 10,000+ that flew in specifically for Sumfest 2019.

Downsound Entertainment also provided free live-streaming on their Youtube Channel and DSE TV for the entire shows on Friday & Saturday night.

The Livestreams were also highly attended with over 10K international viewers all joining in on the good vibes and stellar performances.

If you missed it or want to watch again all of the performances are on their channel HERE https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHWqekyGOTkdu8IlcapvJSw/videos

For more news on Reggae Sumfest visit: https://reggaesumfest.com/
Original Article from Reggae Festival Guide

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Yes, Jamaica is a real place. That’s a question that commonly pops up on social media because some of the things you see about Jamaica…you can only see in Jamaica. And only understand it in a Jamaican context. I am biased by birth, but I truly feel that the island of Jamaica is magnificent for so many reasons.

A place with beautiful weather, delicious food, the most charismatic people you’ll ever meet, gorgeous landscapes, a tourism industry like no other, a unique style of music that has transcended borders and inspired a multitude of sub-genres within the genre, and an abundance of talent performing, managing, and maintaining the industry that makes this island experience one that millions continue to return to. Reggae Sumfest is one night of the year where Jamaica has the opportunity to put this talent on full display and remind the world just how powerful and influential reggae music is.

Downsound Entertainment, in association with sponsors including Grace Foods, Pepsi Jamaica, Jamaica Tourism, Mastercard, Caribbean Airlines Wray & Nephew, and many other top brands and businesses presented the annual Reggae Sumfest music festival in Montego Bay, Jamaica this weekend, after a week of pre-show festivities. A symposium, social media awards, a sound clash, and themed parties helped to get visitors and locals in a reggae frame of mind before the two nights of performances began.

My experience with Reggae Sumfest has been top notch, and I continue to be impressed by how this machine runs. From the accreditation process, to the online updates, an impeccable social media campaign, and outstanding live coverage during the festival…this weekend has proven to be a master class in event production and entertainment, and I am using this opportunity to take notes on how a large-scale event should run. Somehow, that is what seduced me most about this year’s presentation: how seamless it was.

Surely, Sumfest is not without its issues. Like any event planner knows, what happens on the outside and what happens in real-time with check lists and day-to-day execution is probably quite different. That being said, knowing how complex an event of this size and nature must be, I truly believe that Reggae Sumfest continues to be an essential part of the many highlights of Brand Jamaica that circulate around the globe spreading good vibes and positive messaging about our wonderful country.

I feel proud. Truly. Despite the awesome performances, and the new additions to the Jamaican entertainment story (Friday night with no Squash, and Buju’s return to the festival), I feel proud to be of Jamaican descent. Proud to see the all-Jamaican lineup of artists, and the supporting cast around them like the marketers, the reporters, and the various ambassadors. It felt like success. It felt like a home run. It felt like the perfect packaging of a culture and environment that so many of us love dearly. It felt like Jamaican excellence.

I learned a lot about Sumfest this year. Although it has existed for over two decades, with Sunsplash preceding it: this is no new occurrence. In fact, festivals like Sumfest, and Rebel Salute, and other special events have been drawing specialty crowds to Jamaica for years. This particular year, however, I learned a lot of great facts about the Sumfest brand and what is has become in 2019.

For example, I listened to a Jamaican PR Strategist discuss the changes made to Sumfest so that now Jamaican artists are highlighted, without relying on American/foreign stars to headline the show. I learned about the restructuring of the event to reduce the festival to two nights, yet still providing a full week of warm-up activities to accommodate those who want to enjoy a few days of celebration before the show.

I was able to hear what the Sumfest administrators thought about elements of Jamaican culture like the sound clash, and how reggae lovers from outside of the Caribbean are studying and indulging in the culture, and mastering aspects of it in their own unique ways. As someone that was born and raised in Canada, I enjoy learning about how Jamaican residents perceive their cultural impact, and am also proud to see Jamaican-Canadians like King Turbo Sound, Chelsea Stewart, and others have prominent roles in the weekend’s proceedings.

Hearing Joe Bogdanovich speak about the importance of supporting generational changes in music, and seeing it reflected in some of the performances was interesting, as was listening to his assistant and event administrator Karla Jankee discuss her multiple roles, and how they take her across the world sharing the good news of reggae. From the interviews and pre-show with Kamilah McDonald and Nikki Z, and the engaging social media narrative, Sumfest was off to a good start before it even began.

via @cstewartsings
The show opened with Toronto’s very own Chelsea Stewart backed by the Warrior Love Band, and continued to feature new acts like Mr. Chumps, Celebrity, and Ricky Tee’s. Watching them in interview and on stage, I was reminded of Rygin King and his role in last year’s Sumfest. As mentioned, “you never known who will be the next big thing.” It was interesting to see the news faces and speculate about where they may or may not be by Sumfest 2020. It’s a reminder of the constant creativity in music and the culture, and how quickly legacies are built, or in some unfortunate cases…forgotten.

Harry Toddla provided many great flashbacks, injecting a new energy to the evening from before midnight. DJ’s Liquid and Noah Powa were most definitely entertaining, bringing an element of laughter and parody, and a few impersonations. Also funny: the evening’s host.

Admittedly, I’m late to the Shauna Chin narrative, but after that performance of hers, I think I’m going to go back into blog history and see just how significant her redemption statement really was and why. I believe this may also involve pursuing the Instagram timeline of Foota Hype…and I’m 100% sure the story will be shocking, as were her outfits and her defiant lyrics.

During Shauna Controlla’s performance, my attention lingered on the Jamaican audience and their amazing method of paying extreme attention to every detail on stage, while still appearing to be quite disinterested. I remembered this from my visit to Rebel Salute earlier this year where despite witnessing some of THE most exciting performance of the night, the audience was still hesitant to exhibit extreme enjoyment.

This is one of the elements of the Jamaican spirit that I most appreciate: the ridiculously high entertainment standards, and an acute attention to detail, wardrobe, movements, and nuance. The Jamaican musical audience is probably one of the most aware–and critical–of listeners internationally. Not easily impressed, they truly make the performers work for accolades and earn their forwards.

via @bojtv
Even Munga, performing so many classics that I had to remind myself to give them another listen this weekend. The height of Munga’s career was also the height of my young party life. In a 2007 clip of Munga’s first concert in Toronto (in a mediocre video with abusively terrible audio quality that I should be embarrassed to link back to), I was quite excited to hear “Earthquake” and his other string of hits. I’m glad he has come back to the stage and resurrected his career with style.

via @loopjamaica
Also exciting for a woman of my age: seeing Spragga Benz back on stage, looking as good as ever. Full of charm. A youthful glow. Possessing that same distinguished voice that we all loved some 25 years ago. And whether he was performing “Machine Gun Kelly” (straight from the basement parties of 1995), or his latest hit “Differ”…it was a joy. I’m sure I wasn’t the only one also patiently waiting for him to remove the outer layer of clothing and remind us of how many hours he’s been putting in at the gym. He look proper.

Just before Elephant Man returned to the Sumfest stage, a switch of hosts for the evening presented the lovely Miss Kitty draped in red excitement, and a perfect match for the increase in energy that Ele brought to the venue. My artists! The ones that bring the nostalgia, the dance moves, and the good feelings that go along with each memory attached to their popular songs.

via My Jamaica Today
Elephant Man was fabulous, and everything we needed him to be. He ran. He climbed. He took off pieces of his costume armour, and he reminded us of exactly who he be. A legend of dancehall, and someone that we can always hold in high regard and look at fondly whether he’s performing a new album, or simply making us move with his original classics. We owe Elephant Man a lot. He brought us all so much joy, laughter, and, well…”energy” over the years. He is a treasure, for sure.

Agent Sasco, was excellent as per usual. He is a legend in the making, and that voice of his always reminds me that he is one of a kind. Spice: a consummate performer, with so many outfits and stage moments worth remembering. She truly is on top of her game right now, and it’s nice to see.

Beenie Man and Bounty Killer, Koffee and Chronixx. It almost goes without saying. These are artists that have all proven themselves, in various ways, to be irreplaceable icons in the reggae music industry. So much greatness, and so many great songs to accompany their existence.

With a backdrop of morning sunshine in Montego Bay, Dexta Daps, Govana, Aidonia, and a few other new artists like Shane E, Fully Bad, and Jahvillani closed out the show. As for the 6ixx Squad and Squash…unfortunately his big moment is a thing of hypothetical planning only. According to reports, the police did not approve of the profanity used by other artists, and the fact that the show was running over its permitted time…so they locked it off.

Festival Night 2 brought in a few early acts, before the highly anticipated performance from Dalton Harris took place. One thing is for sure: the man can SING. Like really, really sing. He was definitely a showman. He was for sure a little bit defensive. Dalton had a lot to prove and a lot to say, and in the end…I have to give it up for his talent, which is undeniable. He is a force.

Any appearance from Jah9 and Etana are good appearances, as far as I’m concerned. Those two woman embody grace and intelligence, and I do believe they are an amazing and necessarily element to the music scene. From the Shauna Controlla and Spice sexiness, to the conscious lyrics and messaging of Jah9 and Etana, Jamaican women were presented from all angles.

The women continued to inspire me when Protoje brought out Lila Ike and Sevana as a part of his set. In addition to featuring Jesse Royal and Sasco during his segment, he truly did shine a light on Lila and Sevana in the best ways. Solid. As they sang, as they moved, and as they shared their lyrics, I was so inspired by what they represented, again in another contrast to the previous female performers. It presented such a thorough look at womanhood, and female expression. It felt like big things were about to happen for women in the reggae, and I’m all here for it.

I fully expect Lila Ike to have a role in next year’s Sumfest. Of all the artists, she really left an impression on me as someone who truly deserves an increased in profile.

Uncle Beres. No words. The quiet Jamaican audience from the early hours immediately transformed into a most humbled collective of music lovers and fans. Hit after hit, folks sang along with Beres, cheered to Beres, and praised their artist with the utmost respect and appreciation. A living legend and someone a true reggae fan can never, ever tire of. Beres Hammond was a complete pleasure to watch, as always.

Romain Virgo had another poignant moment of the night, when the young and beautiful Teshae Silvera joined him on stage to sing her cover of Romain’s song calling out child abuse. “You dutty man! You dutty man! Leave the people pickney dem alone!” she sang, to one of the biggest forwards of the night. This angel left an impression on many, and when I first glimpsed her Instagram page she only had 60 followers. I most definitely expect this to be a different situation by tomorrow, now that her handle @Teshae_Silvera is being circulated.

Christopher Martin was excellent. He is always excellent, and in the second-most anticipated appearance of Buju Banton in nearly a decade…he returned to the Sumfest stage to an equally warm reception as his first post-incarceration show. What’s not to love about Buju? He is embedded in our hearts, and it is still great to live in a world where we can see him on road. Also a treat: his new song Steppa was also released this week.

Jamaica has my heart. The island, the people, the food, the culture, the language, the antics, the brilliance, the everything. Most importantly, the music that plays while we live life, while we travel, and while we grow. Reggae music allows an innate appreciation for the culture, just by rhythm alone. The drums and basslines, the horns and background vocalists–from the Warrior Love Band to the Harmony House Band and Singers…it’s all just a spectacular music to take in. Especially on a large scale.

Reggae Sumfest has proven, yet again, to be the biggest reggae show on earth with a great structure, and an even greater pool of talent to select from. Big up to the team involved in executing this year’s event so wonderfully, and for making the experience for a reggae lover living out here in the diaspora, to feel a little bit of home every time I take part in a viewing event like this. From the production value, to the praise for young Teshae, Sumfest was entertaining from beginning to end. It was Jamaican excellence, personified. Next year won’t miss me.

Written by Stacey Marie Robinson for Kya Publishing’s “Urban Toronto Tales” blog.

 

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News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Mon. July 22, 2019: Dubbed as the ‘world’s greatest reggae show,’ Jamaica’s Reggae Sumfest concluded early Sunday morning in Montego Bay, Jamaica. It was marked by stellar performances by the island’s top reggae and dancehall artists. Here are our Top 10 Performances from Sumfest 2019:

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Jamaica Tourism Minister Hon. Edmund Bartlett has indicated that J$ 1 Billion was generated at the just concluded Reggae Sumfest music festival held at Catherine Hall in Montego Bay.

“This year was arguably the largest Reggae Sumfest in terms of attendance from both local and overseas guests. On the visitor arrival side, we saw approximately 10,000 people coming to the island for the festival which is an increase of 3000 over last year.

More importantly we estimate the revenue impact from the festival to be $J1 Billion based on average room nights stay of locals and visitors and taxes,” said Minister Bartlett.

Reggae Sumfest, which began in 1993, has been described as the largest music festival in Jamaica and the Caribbean, taking place each year in mid-July in Montego Bay. It attracts crowds of all ages from all over the world and locally and has featured a variety of Jamaican reggae artists as well as international acts.

Jamaica Tourism Minister: Reggae Sumfest generates J$1 billion

Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett (R) engages in discussion with Prime Minister, the Most Honourable Andrew Holness at the Jamaica Tourist Board booth at Reggae Sumfest held at Catherine Hall in Montego Bay. Minister Bartlett has indicated that the estimated revenue impact of the festival is J$1 Billion.


Minister Bartlett added that, “The success of entertainment festivals such as Sumfest augurs well for tourism as it boosts arrivals and has a major economic impact in and around Montego Bay.

Through these types of events, hotels both large and small, attractions and smaller players in the sector get to truly benefit from the extensive value chain of tourism.”

The weeklong festival usually kicks off with the Sumfest Beach Party  which is followed with a series of events including a free Street Dance. Then there are two nights of the main festival with live performances featuring some of the best Dancehall and Reggae Artists in the world.

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Purple-carpet affair for Sumfest Get Social Awards
by
Shereita Grizzle – Staff Reporter
June 19, 2019

Public relations specialist Tara Playfair-Scott says it’s all systems go for the inaugural staging of the Reggae Sumfest Get Social Awards.

The awards ceremony is set to take place next Saturday at Downsound Records’ headquarters on Belmont Road.

With nominees including some of the biggest names in the local music industry, as well as popular social-media personalities (local and international), the event is expected to be a star-studded affair.

Playfair-Scott told THE STAR that excitement has been steadily building and that with voting now closed, there is a heightened level of anticipation among nominees.

“We have had so many different persons telling us how excited they are that we have these awards. A lot of the nominees said they are so happy to be recognised by being nominated. We are glad to be able to recognise persons from all different fields. Plans are coming along great; we are coming down to the big day, so we are all excited,” she said.

She also revealed that the event will be streamed live on Sumfest’s Facebook page.

Interviews with the artistes will also be accommodated on the night via what she dubbed the ‘Go Live Room’.

Although many artistes are expected to be in attendance, it is still unclear if there will be any live performances on the night.

Playfair-Scott urged patrons to come out to the event as the night will be filled with surprises.

“Maybe we will have performances. You will have to be there to find out,” she said.

Nominees for the awards were announced via Sumfest’s Instagram page last month. Voting opened immediately after the announcements and closed last Friday.

Votes are currently being tallied, and the winners will be announced on June 29.

More than 100 social-media influencers were shortlisted across 35 categories including Best Male and Female Dancehall Artistes, Best DJ, Best Producer, Blogger of the Year, Kid Stars and many more.

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Jamaica’s Iconic Music Festival, Reggae SumfesttReturns for 27th Year
By South Florida Caribbean News June 3, 2019
#ReggaeSumfest Brings Stellar Line-Up to #MontegoBay July 14-22, 2019
MONTEGO BAY, Jamaica – This summer marks the 27th anniversary of Reggae Sumfest, Jamaica’s iconic music festival, set for Montego Bay from July 14-22, 2019.
Jamaica’s Iconic Music Festival, Reggae Sumfest Returns for 27th Year
 
Organized by Downsound Entertainment and sponsored by the Jamaica Tourist Board, the premier music festival comes on the heels of UNESCO’s designation of reggae as an intangible cultural heritage.
 
Reggae Sumfest brings together reggae legends with local and mainstream acts of other popular music genres that have originated on the island and broadly influenced the chart topping urban and pop hits of today.
 
The star-studded line-up on Festival Nights 1 & 2 will include global reggae sensation Buju Official, dancehall veterans Beenie Man and #BountyKiller, as well as Chronixx, Spice, Spragga Benz, #Elephantman, Protoje, Beres Hammond, and more.
 
Jamaica’s Iconic Music Festival, Reggae Sumfest Returns for 27th YearReggae Sumfest 7-night line-up of events
July 14 – Mornin’ Medz Brunch Party
July 15 – Street Dance Party
July 16 – All White Party
July 17 – Blitz All Black Party / Bunji Garlinrlin’s Birthday Celebration
July 18 – Global Sound Clash
July 19 – Festival Night 1
July 20 – Festival Night 2
“It’s been a historic year for both tourist arrivals and Reggae music, and we are thrilled to host this premier music festival again,” noted Donovan White, Jamaica’s Director of Tourism. “Reggae Sumfest continues to add unprecedented value to Jamaica, the birthplace of the music genre, as it offers one of the most authentic cultural experiences on the island for locals and visitors alike.”
 
As one of the most viewed festivals in the world, Reggae Sumfest will be live streamed across broadcast and other platforms, taking Jamaican music, artists, and culture to every continent and country around the world.
 
Hotel Accommodations for Reggae Sumfest
Montego Bay, Jamaica’s resort capital, boasts an array of accommodation options for Reggae Sumfest attendees:
 
Boutique: S Hotel, overlooking Jamaica’s famed Doctor’s Cave beach, is a new 120-room hotel artfully combining discrete urban sophistication and a laid-back resort lifestyle. In celebration of the recent grand opening, travelers can book at special introductory rates from $179 per day.
Luxury: Half Moon Resort, an iconic property which sits on 400 acres of tropical gardens and is bordered by two miles of beach, offers 10% off the best available rate for guests who book a minimum 4-night stay at least 14 days in advance. Rates start at $222.30 per night and include roundtrip airport transfers.
All-Inclusive: The all-inclusive Holiday Inn Resort Montego Bay offers a beachfront location, comfortable rooms and unlimited dining. Rates start at $216.60 per person.
Additional taxes, service charges, blackout dates and other restrictions may apply for hotel packages.
 
Click here to purchase tickets to Reggae Sumfest, and for more information about Jamaica or planning your trip, click here.
https://sflcn.com/jamaica-iconic-music-festival-reggae-sumfest-returns-27th-year/
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Reggae Sumfest

BLITZ

All-Black

Reggae Sumfest Pre-party

Bunji’s Birthday Bash!!

Wednesday,
July 17th from 7pm – Midnight

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BLITZ “ALL BLACK” on July 17th at The Hard Rock Cafe in Montego Bay
is the 3rd in the series of lead-up events that plan to have
Mo’ Bay partying the week away.
Blitz is is a night of glamour, and this year
Bunji Garlin celebrates his Birthday along with his wife
Fay-Ann Lyons
on Wednesday, July 17th from 7pm-Midnight.
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With Hennessy on deck, and Crazy NeilBishop Escobar and Rolexxon the wheels of steel, Blitz All Black is going to be a night to remember!
ABOUT BUNJI GARLIN
Ian Antonio Alavarez
Born in Arima, Trinidad, this multiple T&T Soca Monarch
& Ragga Soca King is a prolific lyricist.
Bunji is considered international Soca royalty.
He is affectionately known as “de girls dem darlin”
(although now married to Faye-Ann Lyons, a fellow performer)
who will also be on hand celebrating Bunji’s birthday.
 
This talented musician will be bringing the FIIIIYAH 
(you know how he says it) as he celebrates his BIRTHDAY
at Blitz this year!
 ABOUT FAY-ANN LYONS
Born in Point Fortin, Trinidad, Fay-Ann is the second generation of a Caribbean music dynasty. Daughter of “Lady Gypsy” and “Superblue,” this Caribbean Queen wears her crown well
Fay-Ann Lyons is a three-time Trinidad and Tobago Carnival Road March champion (2003, 2008, 2009) and the 2009 International Soca Monarch and International Groovy Soca Monarch champion. She created history (again) when she won the International Soca Monarch for the first time in 2009, as the first female to win the Power category, and the first individual (male or female) to win the Power, Groovy and People’s Choice awards on Fantastic Friday (aka Carnival Friday) during the finals of the competition which is held annually in Trinidad.
She also went on to win the Carnival Road March that year, becoming the first Soca artist to win that Soca ‘triplet’ of titles. She is the first (and only) woman to accomplish that feat while pregnant. Fay-Ann is the youngest solo artist (male or female), still actively recording, with multiple wins of the Carnival Road March crown.
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So put on your ALL BLACK and join us at Hard Rock 
on the beach in Montego Bay.
Reggae Sumfest WEbsite
 About Reggae Sumfest:

Sumfest has earned a reputation as the Caribbean’s premier music festival showcasing Jamaica’s indigenous music as well as many other popular global genres of music. Now in its 27th year, the world’s greatest reggae music festival continues to pay homage to the musical genre that originated in Jamaica and has become a global phenomenon. Sumfest continues to add unprecedented value to “Brand Jamaica” by promoting two of the country’s most valuable products – the music and the island itself as a tourist destination.

Since its inception, Sumfest has made Montego Bay and the surrounding areas a prime summer destination for visitors and locals alike who flock to the city to enjoy some of the best talents in Reggae, Dancehall, Hip Hop and R&B. Over the years, Sumfest has partnered with a number of major local and international brands. Our goal is to continue these long-standing partnerships and develop ways to enhance their relationship with Sumfest to drive incremental value for their brands. Sumfest is owned by Joseph Bogdanovich and produced by his company DownSound Entertainment.

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The 6ix to close dancehall night at Sumfest

May 28, 2019
Members of the 6ix, Chronic Law (left) and Squash.
Members of the 6ix, Chronic Law (left) and Squash.

Less than a year since emerging as artistes to contend with, frontmen of the ‘6ix’ and other rural acts are slated to close Festival Night One at Reggae Sumfest on, July 19.

It will not only be a historic moment, as it will see young, meteoric, rural deejays culminating the most-anticipated night at the festival, but will also mark the performance debut of each act on the Sumfest stage.

St Ann-born Jahvillani and Montegonians Shane E and Unknown Gringo will be tasked with maintaining the morning crowd alongside 6ix members Squash (from Montego Bay) and St Thomas-native Chronic Law.

Show promoter Joe Bogdanovich is confident in their abilities to deliver.

“It’s gonna be what the girls like, and that is the 6ix,” he told THE STAR. “I think they’re gonna do well because they’ve got a lot of fans, they’ve got a lot of lyrics. They’re very confident in themselves and their abilities with the ladies, so it’s exciting, it’s young and it’s fresh.”

This mimics the ending of the first of two performance nights last year, where fast-rising Montegonian acts Teejay and Rygin King performed in tandem with Tommy Lee Sparta. Bogdanovich said the Second City is currently at the fore of “reincarnating the dancehall scene, which is very much needed,” influencing the decision to close with these particular acts.

KEEPING THE MUSIC ALIVE

“They all support one another, and it’s an example of unity which I love,” he said. “We want to keep the music alive and be the best that we can and represent Jamaica like no one else can, that’s what it is all about for me.”

Squash’s manager, Junior ‘Heavy D’ Fraser, commended the artistes for taking the reins to close the night, stating that many artistes often shy away from the task.

“It’s not an easy task, but dem guys deh mek everything look easy, so far, everywhere we go; dem nuh fear nutten, dem ready bad,” he said.

“This is rare for an artiste to perform at Sumfest for the first time and close it. It speaks to di power dem have inna music now, and me think the 6ix a go live up to it inna great style.

“Dem have social media on lock, and me see people stand up inna rain a wait for them to perform. You know Jamaican crowd nuh give nuh chance, so when yuh see dem a operate so wid artiste, yuh know seh a bare star,” Heavy D said.

For Unknown Gringo, gracing the Sumfest stage has been a childhood dream. Since embarking on a music career in 2016 (under the moniker NoFace Unknown), he said he has worked hard to earn this opportunity and looks forward to engaging fans.

“Sumfest was one of the stages I wanted to be on growing up, but nothing happens before its time, so I appreciate it and will step forward and do my best,” he started.

“I feel good to be part of the rural artistes closing the first night, the hard work I’ve been putting in is paying off now, so I’m just going to continue.”

Blessings A Flow deejay Shane E also sees this as another milestone in his career.

“This is a major move and fans can expect nothing but greatness, like what we always do. It’s gonna be an epic performance, a bang, I’m sure of that.”

Unfolding at the Catherine Hall Entertainment Complex in Montego Bay, the night will also see performances from artistes like Beenie Man, Bounty Killer, Govana, Shauna Chyn and Spice.

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Nikki Z Says NO To Plastic At Reggae Sumfest

Published:Sunday | May 26, 2019 | Kimberley Small – Staff Reporter
Nikki Z
Nikki Z

With many major entertainment events, there comes the issue of waste. Earlier this year, carnival bands campaigned about reducing plastic consumption by walking with your own party cups and providing biodegradable lunchboxes for the thousands of revellers who hit the road.

Before the masses travel to the north coast for Reggae Sumfest, popular broadcaster Nikki Z is in the midst of launching another such campaign as an ambassador for the world-renowned Alligator Head Foundation.

“When I heard that the team at Reggae Sumfest wanted to find a better way to discard the plastics accumulated at these big events, I got together with the team at Alligator Head Foundation, and we met,” she told The Sunday Gleaner.

Nikki Z, along with internationally renowned reggae band Third World, supermodel, singer, and icon Grace Jones, and young performer Wayne J, is an ambassador for the foundation, which is committed to ocean life restoration.

Nikki Z is along for this ride because her experience in the public eye has proven that advocacy through public figures is effective. “It definitely works. When I talk about certain topics on my page and radio show, people are always contacting me because this is information they didn’t know.”

She continued: “When we listen to what they’re saying – predicting the rise in the water over the few years, the plastic in the water, what it’s doing and how many animals and oceans are affected – a lot of people never really look into that so when you put in their face little by little, people do get affected – and they want to make changes. The key to it is being consistent and letting them know how to care about the environment.”

ALLIGATOR HEAD FOUNDATION

Francesca Thyssen Bornemisza is board chairwoman of the Alligator Head Foundation. For Vanity Fair Spain’s environmental issue (June 2019), she is Vanity Fair’s cover star and was specially highlighted for her ongoing work for the restoration, conservation, and preservation of natural resources and habitats. “The oceans are the passion of my life. Really,” she told the magazine.

Bornemisza’s father (Baron Hans-Heirinch Thyssen Bornemisza) owned a residence in Jamaica, where her own children were taught to swim. But trips beneath the surface became difficult, and less beautiful, with disappearing reefs and fish. “Fishing had razed the reefs. It was my turning point,” she said. In response, she developed a project between the Thyssen Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21) and The University of the West Indies, the Alligator Head Foundation.

“If you witness the annihilation of several species, of such radical changes in the ecosystem, you cannot ignore it,” she said.

The foundation is a sequestered six-kilometre conservation area, the Fish Sanctuary of East Portland, and it is on a mission to revitalise natural systems and restore marine life. In July 2016, The East Portland Special Fishery Conservation Area was officially gazetted under the Jamaican Fishing Industry Act. Since then, biomass has increased by 200 per cent. Bornemisza said: “It’s amazing how the oceans recover if they are given the opportunity.”

AMBASSADORSHIP & ADVOCACY

As an ambassador of Alligator Head Foundation, Nikki Z hopes to impart environmental awareness to those who may attend the highly anticipated reggae music festival weekend. “I’m gonna be going on the road with Downsound producer Skatta Burrell – just talking to people about the plastic ban and why it’s so important that we really use less – and also to recycle – find ways to reuse. Keeping it green … and blue!”

She revealed that the Alligator Head Foundation would have a booth space at Reggae Sumfest.

“We’re gonna have some pretty cool things on display. I don’t want to say too much about that now, but it’s all about teaming up with great people who want to do great things for the environment. We’ll be working with them – hopefully, for a long time to come. We’ll be fine-tuning better strategies so we can reduce the imprint that we leave,” Nikki Z said.

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Reggae Sumfest throws launch party in MoBay

May 17, 2019

With a raging bonfire giving a silvery look to the beautiful white sand, and the full moon overhead adding a golden glow, it was all fun as locals mixed and mingled alongside the curious guests at the western city’s official launch of Downsound Entertainment’s Reggae Sumfest 2019 at the Iberostar Grande hotel in Montego Bay, St James, on Wednesday night.

“It is going to be a fantastic festival and I am really looking forward to giving the patron a fantastic experience,” said Downsound Entertainment’s CEO, Joe Bogdanovich, who acquired the Reggae Sumfest franchise in 2016.

The five-day festival blasts off on Sunday, July 14, and will see the likes of Beres Hammond, Chronixx, Buju Banton, Beenie Man and Bounty Killer among the heavyweights performing.

Five of the artistes booked for the 2019 edition of Reggae Sumfest delivered sneak previews of what to expect when they grace the main stage of the reggae festival in July.

Shauna showed a lot of ‘skin,’ and created a nice buzz as she delivered Independent and Control Button. Shane E was velvet-smooth, dishing out, Bad Mindand Get a Fight; while Keniel Merital was vocally powerful in unleashing, Money Nuffand My Money.

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