Tag: Caribbean

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$1 billion generated from Reggae Sumfest, says Bartlett
LOOP NEWS CREATED : 22 JULY 2019BUSINESS

Montego Bay has been on the receiving end of a much-needed cash windfall.
That’s according to Tourism Minister Edmund Bartlett who has indicated that $1 billion was generated at the just concluded Reggae Sumfest music festival held at the Catherine Hall Entertainment Complex in Montego Bay, St James

“This year was arguably the largest Reggae Sumfest in terms of attendance from both local and overseas guests. On the visitor arrival side, we saw approximately 10,000 people coming to the island for the festival which is an increase of 3,000 over last year. More importantly, we estimate the revenue impact from the festival to be $1 billion based on average room nights stay of locals and visitors and taxes,” said Bartlett through a press release from his ministry.

Reggae Sumfest, which began in 1993, has been described as the largest music festival in Jamaica and the Caribbean, taking place each year in mid-July in Montego Bay. It attracts crowds of all ages from all over the world and locally, and has featured a variety of Jamaican reggae artists as well as international acts.

“The success of entertainment festivals such as Sumfest augurs well for tourism as it boosts arrivals and has a major economic impact in and around Montego Bay. Through these types of events, hotels both large and small, attractions and smaller players in the sector get to truly benefit from the extensive value chain of tourism,” he said.

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Reggae Sumfest 2019 featuring performances by Buju Banton, Beres Hammond, Protoje, Romain Virgo, Etana, Dalton Harris, Chris Martin, Tessellated, Jah 9, Avante, Jovexx, Dre Zee, Faice and Hemar Highcon held at Catherine Hall, Montego Bay on Saturday July 20, 2019. SPONSORED BY QUANTUM CONCEPTS 

Photographed by Kenyon Hemans and Ashley Anguin

Gallery | Reggae Sumfest 2019 Festival Night Two

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Jamaica Tourism Minister Hon. Edmund Bartlett has indicated that J$ 1 Billion was generated at the just concluded Reggae Sumfest music festival held at Catherine Hall in Montego Bay.

“This year was arguably the largest Reggae Sumfest in terms of attendance from both local and overseas guests. On the visitor arrival side, we saw approximately 10,000 people coming to the island for the festival which is an increase of 3000 over last year.

More importantly we estimate the revenue impact from the festival to be $J1 Billion based on average room nights stay of locals and visitors and taxes,” said Minister Bartlett.

Reggae Sumfest, which began in 1993, has been described as the largest music festival in Jamaica and the Caribbean, taking place each year in mid-July in Montego Bay. It attracts crowds of all ages from all over the world and locally and has featured a variety of Jamaican reggae artists as well as international acts.

Jamaica Tourism Minister: Reggae Sumfest generates J$1 billion

Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett (R) engages in discussion with Prime Minister, the Most Honourable Andrew Holness at the Jamaica Tourist Board booth at Reggae Sumfest held at Catherine Hall in Montego Bay. Minister Bartlett has indicated that the estimated revenue impact of the festival is J$1 Billion.


Minister Bartlett added that, “The success of entertainment festivals such as Sumfest augurs well for tourism as it boosts arrivals and has a major economic impact in and around Montego Bay.

Through these types of events, hotels both large and small, attractions and smaller players in the sector get to truly benefit from the extensive value chain of tourism.”

The weeklong festival usually kicks off with the Sumfest Beach Party  which is followed with a series of events including a free Street Dance. Then there are two nights of the main festival with live performances featuring some of the best Dancehall and Reggae Artists in the world.

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Supreme Ventures goes Sumfest

Friday, July 19, 2019

Gail Abrahams

Gaming company Supreme Ventures Limited (SVL) will give away $50,000 to a lucky patron at Reggae Sumfest this week.

According to Gail Abrahams, vice-president of marketing, communications and sponsorships at SVL, there are plans to get Sumfest fans in a festive mood.

“Reggae Sumfest is a world renowned event, it is a platform for many upcoming performers, and it attracts thousands of patrons, both local and overseas. SVL is a strong supporter of entertainment and of honing new talent while at the same time offering a difference and even more excitement to an already exhilarating showcase,” Abrahams said.

“This is an open invitation to Reggae Sumfest patrons to be a part of the SVL excitement this Friday and Saturday night — join us at the Ultimate Lounge,” said Abrahams.

SVL will also promote its new mobile app.

Patrons are invited to visit the SVL booth, sign up and verify their SV Games mobile app account. After sign-up and verification are complete, each patron will become eligible to win $50,000.

SVL will host guests in what is being dubbed The Ultimate Lounge with Cash Pot, lottery machines, and other games.

Reggae Sumfest started on July 14. It culminates this weekend with its live performance segment featuring Beres Hammond, Chronixx, Buju Banton, and Koffee.

— Kevin Jackson

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SUMFEST BUZZ
MoBay experiencing spike in economic activity from reggae festival
BY HORACE HINESObserver West reporter

July 18, 2019

Deja All Inclusive Resort is one of the hotels in Montego Bay that has reported 100 per cent occupancy. (Photo: Philp Lemonte)
MONTEGO BAY, St James — There is a marked increase in economic activity arising from the 26th staging of the week-long Reggae Sumfest, which kicked off on Sunday in the tourist resort city of Montego Bay.

Robin Russell, chairman of the Montego Bay chapter of the Jamaica Hotel and Tourist Association (JHTA), told the Jamaica Observer West yesterday that hotels in and around Montego Bay are now enjoying a 100 per cent occupancy level.

“All hotels are full. The closest hotel rooms are now available in Negril. Everybody is super excited and have been preparing for this week. So far, the events are very good; the street dance and the beach party were very good,” said Russell.

“If the reception from the first two nights of Sumfest is anything to go by, then this year’s staging will be one of the best ever. The line-up is great.”

President of the Montego Bay Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MBCCI), Janet Silvera, expressed similar sentiments.

“Montego Bay is doing very, very well. It’s a good feeling. There are a lot of festivities, the town feels better. I think more Jamaicans are going to come from overseas this year to attend Reggae Sumfest,” she noted.

“Downsound (organisers of the festival) has really hit a winning formula for the event this year, and I think that they are going to do exceptionally well with the festival because people are really looking forward to especially, Friday and Saturday nights.”

She attributes the buzz surrounding the festival to the great anticipation of the performances of reggae kingpins, Buju Banton, Beres Hammond, Chronixx, and others.

“In the history of Sumfest I don’t recall seeing the type of excitement that surrounds it this year, and I believe this is as a result of Buju, Chronixx and Beres Hammond, Koffee, and others,” Silvera said.

Russell, who is also the security manager of the festival, indicted that everything is in place for the two final nights of the event at the Catherine Hall Entertainment Centre venue.

“We are ready. The venue is ready, everything is ready. We have made extra preparations…we have acquired more parking lots. We have created an entertainment zone from the airport all the way to Freeport to facilitate Sumfest in the state of emergency,” Russell expressed.

Claudia Artwell, the venue manager for the Catherine Hall Entertainment Centre, disclosed that a safety team will be added to “the greatest reggae festival on earth this year”.

“We have a safety team that we trained this year along with the fire department. They are trained in basic safety. We are going to ensure that everybody is comfortable. We will be going around and checking if fire extinguishers are working, make sure that safety procedures are adhered to, and so on…right now Downsound is on the top of things,” said Artwell.

Commander of the St James police division Superintendent Vernon Ellis revealed that the police are prepared for the hosting of the annual reggae festival.

“For the Reggae Sumfest we would have received additional assets to ensure that we secure the city in a proper way for the period,” Superintendent Ellis assured.

Sumfest 2019 features Buju Banton, Beres Hammond, Chronixx, Beenie Man, and Bounty Killa.

Other acts down to thrill the thousands expected for the festival include Tarrus Riley, Chris Martin, Romaine Virgo, X-Factor winner Dalton Harris, Agent Sasco, Spice, and Spragga Benz.

The 26-year-old festival staged under the theme ‘Our Music, Our Festival’, got underway with a beach party and will move to the main venue, Catherine Hall Entertainment Centre, from Friday, July 19 to Saturday, July 20.

Meanwhile, craft traders, restaurant operators, and other businesses are also cashing in on the influx of visitors to the resort city.

There is definitely an increase in business over the past few days, and we expect that sales will further increase on the weekend when the festival moves into high gear,” said a craft trader.

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Networking A Priority At Sumfest’s Reggae Symposium

Published:Friday | June 28, 2019 | Kimberley Small/Staff Reporter

The synergy between cannabis and Jamaican music; the relevance of radio in the advent of social media; the technical art of sound engineering; the question of appropriation or misappropriation and the correlation between music and violence are all topics to be tackled during the Reggae Symposium, on July 12 at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge on The University of the West Indies, Mona campus.

As part of Reggae Sumfest’s expanded week-long activities, the symposium casts a more scrutinizing gaze on the local music industry, with the hope to facilitate networking and learning opportunities for aspiring music business professionals.

Though he was not a participant for last year’s inaugural symposium, music scholar Clyde McKenzie revealed that he was present at the genesis of the idea to introduce elements that extend Reggae Sumfest into a form resembling major international music festivals.

“The trend is for festivals around the world to encompass as many different features as possible. In discussions with Joe Bogdanovich, I said that a symposium would be a nice feature. He was in agreement because his mind seemed to be going in that direction,” McKenzie told The Gleaner.

He continued: “Joe and Sumfest should be applauded for this initiative because it is another facet of a festival that we need to highlight. You need to be entertained, but you also need to be informed. The aim is for younger people in the business to get the opportunity to network with and learn.”

Free of charge, the symposium only requires online registration for attendants. “There is not a cent charged for it, and we’ll be making sure there will be refreshment and snacks so people are comfortable coming there. There is limited space. There are opportunities to register via the Reggae Sumfest website. First come, first served,” McKenzie said. kimberley.small@gleanerjm.com

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Bounty Killer is really feeling himself right now and rightfully so.
The dancehall kingpin says he is proud of the fact that three years shy of 50, and after more than 27 years in Jamaica’s music industry, he is aging like fine wine. “Gyal dem say mi aging gracefully; handsome dem wah hold mi ransom and 47 fit me better than 27,” the Killa declared recently in an Instagram post, which attracted more than 10,000 and hundreds of comments from adoring female fans.

Bounty Killer, born Rodney Pryce in Kingston in 1972, grew up in the battle-hardened community of Seaview Gardens in Jamaica’s capital, Kingston. He celebrated his 47th birthday two weeks ago on June 12, 2019.

The artiste, who stands at six feet two inches tall, has credited the practicing of good eating habits learned from his late mother Miss Ivy, as well as doing push-ups, for his sleek form and youthful appearance.

His tendency to spend copious amounts of time with his own children, as well as chilling with, and mentoring other youngsters through his foundation, may also be having some impact on the Killer maintaining his youthful looks.

Less than two weeks ago, he was in the company of several at-risk boys in Kingston, providing motivational talks as a part of #OurSons – an interactive session for boys and young men under the Bounty Killer Foundation.

The doting dad was also recently captured in a photo, sitting in the stands at one of his younger daughter’s school’s sports day where he took time out to give her his undivided support.

The self-proclaimed Poor People Governor shot to prominence in 1992 and became a household name following the legendary clash with arch-rival Dancehall artiste Beenie Man a year later at the Sting 1993 show, at Jamworld in St. Catherine.

This year at Reggae Sumfest, Bounty will square off with Beenie Man, in a much-anticipated friendly musical rivalry stint on Friday night, July 19, at the Catherine Hall venue in a segment dubbed ‘One night, one stage, two legends,’ a performance the artiste has predicted will be explosive.

His almost three-decade musical span has seen the release of iconic tracks such as the sound-system clash classic, Dub Fi Dub, Copper Shot and Spy Fi Die in his early Dancehall days, appearances on Multi-platinum discs, recording with some of the biggest names in world music, a joint Grammy and a plethora of other accolades.

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Chronic Law Drops Feel-Good Single “Live Life”
by J.D. Smith  June 26, 2019
Chronic Law drops a new track “Live Life” listen to it below.

Here we go again another Chronic Law another BIG SONG. “Live Life” his new track outlines the changes his life has gone through over the years. “But my life change up perfect, Nuffa dem seh mi aguh dead early, Nuffbwoy mi see hype and when dem reach up high dem drop like bird sh*t.” This track distributed by Johnny Wonder’s 21st habilos distribution is primed for DJ decks this summer. Another one in the theme of summer happiness has entered the dancehall sphere.

Chronic Law is one of the new breakout acts in dancehall this year. He is aligned with the new 6ixx crew headed by Squash. Law will be taking the stage at Reggae Sumfest in July when the 6ixx crew is expected to close Dancehall Night.

Gwaan do it Law Boss, Live Life!

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Daddy 1 ready to prove lyrical potency
by Stephanie Lyew – STAR Writer
June 20, 2019

Another name coming from the famed dancehall alliance known as the 6ix is Salt Spring native Daddy 1.

Armed with a story and catchy chorus lines, Daddy 1 says he is ready to prove himself lyrically loyal to the 6ix and worthy to dancehall fans worldwide.

Daddy 1, given name Adrian Bailey, is the youngest member of the alliance, next to Bobby6ix, brother of frontman Squash.

“We grew up together in Salt Spring and ever since then Squash has been like a brother to me, and in 2016 him give me a chance to start do music,” Daddy 1 shared.

The 20-year-old says he received the name from his mother.

“From them hear the name, them say it different and all that was left to do was show that I am different; I always knew I would get a buss because my style is different and because of the love and determination I have for music,” he told THE STAR.

The newcomer has already released more than five tracks in 2019, some of which he said, “Like Next Level, Custom, Out Here and Anthem are attracting dubplate business from selectors and sound systems as far as Japan; although new to this, money can be made.”

He said that people have become more curious about him since hearing that the 6ix will be on Reggae Sumfest.

“Dem want to know what this young deejay bringing to the stage but it’s a great feeling to even know we going be at this event, and me want the people know me have it under control,” he said.

With a personal style Daddy 1 describes as ‘cool and deadly’ in the way he dresses and how his lyrics are constructed, he believes there is potential for a Grammy as a trap-dancehall artiste.

His most recent release, Women’s Empowerment, is a female anthem and possibly one that will have females, new and old, in the music industry going wild.

Daddy 1 gives respect to his own mother Shelly, while in the same breath ‘bigs up’ artistes and disc jockeys like Shenseea, DJ Sunshine, Koffee, and Jada Kingdom, for being independent.

“Ah just two girl me hear ah talk weh never even know me a Daddy 1, and me squat ah listen and one a dem say she don’t want no man unless them say 6ix and me go write the song Anthem – is just music,” he explained, “and the females deserve it once them a put in the work.”

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Published:Sunday | June 23, 2019 | 12:16 AMSade Gardner – Gleaner Writer
Ian Allen

Elephant Man is a music junkie, period.

A saunter through his mansion in Havendale, St Andrew, revealed stereos blasting local radio station ZIP 103FM near the poolside while music from a flatscreen TV filled the halls of the main floor.

Ele himself is a walking music library. For almost every life experience he recalled, he trailed off in a beat, thumping his chest, snapping his fingers, and deejaying his best impersonation of Bounty Killer, Shabba Ranks, Beenie Man, Mad Cobra, Simpleton et al, with joy in his eyes and gratification on his face.

He attained no formal training for a talent that would earn him scores of chart-topping singles. Instead, the Seaview Gardens-bred artiste honed his craft by toasting among friends and isolating himself in a room with Celine Dion on repeat, as he taught himself to reach challenging notes.

“Musically, mi did always know a waa gwaan. My house did deh two gate from Shabba Ranks’ house. Bounty Killer live bout five minutes up the road. Ninjaman never come from Seaview, but anytime him come, we run up the road and look pon him from head to toe cause a our god that. We learn from them man deh, even Supercat. Dem tek music serious and nuh play round wid performance,” Ele told The Sunday Gleaner.

‘We’ included childhood friends Nitty Kutchie and Boom Dandimite, with whom he would later form Scare Dem Crew, with Harry Toddler from Waltham Park Road, Kingston.

Though he had an endorsement from Bounty (he even got a gig cutting grass for his mother, Miss Ivy), Ele’s mother did not approve of his musical ambitions.

Given name Oneil Bryan, the Norman Manley High School student earned his moniker through his ‘Dumbo’ nickname derived from his sizable ears. First deejaying on ‘Vietnam corner’ in Phase One, the 16-year-old took his skills to the neighbouring Waterhouse community at King Jammys studio, where things took a new turn.

“Jammys and everybody start record Killer, and Killer seh him buss, but him friend dem still deh deh. We seh come mek we start Scare Dem Crew cause we nah go buss solo,” he said. “Killer used to call we out pon shows, and a so we start get recognised.”

Ele fashioned the idea of members dyeing their hair to distinguish themselves from other crews, and Toddler was game. Kutchie kept his hair black, but Dandimite later got on board. With tracks like Many Many, Nuh Dress Like Girl, and Girls Every Day, the group bore success before disbanding in 1999.

BIGGEST RECORD
Dancehall was on a new wave by the new millennium, and the following year produced Elephant Man’s solo album debut, Comin’ 4 U, on Greensleeves Records. His biggest record is the 2003 dance number Pon De River, Pon De Bank, which spearheads a slew of dance hits like Signal the Plane, Blase, Scooby Doo, and Fan Dem Off complementing earlier tracks Online and Log On.

His catalogue supports his affinity for music, with a range of sampled works like Bad Man a Bad Man, remixed from R. Kelly’s The World’s Greatest; Willie Bounce, sampled from Gloria Gaynor’s I Will Survive, and Bun Bad Mind, a take on the gospel single Hear My Cry Oh Lord by Marvia Providence.

His star factor was supported by his signature lisp, spirited performances, and variegated outfits, and it did not take long for international acts to notice. His collaborative projects boast names like Janet Jackson, Busta Rhymes, Mariah Carey, Lil’ Jon, and Kat Deluna. He also did a stint at P Diddy’s Bad Boy Records, which released his Grammy-nominated album, Let’s Get Physica l, in 2008.

Growing fame accompanied some bumps in the road. Father to 20 children, Elephant Man’s personal life has been blasted in the media, with claims that he is not an active father. Then there were the court cases, a repossessed car, and other rumours swirled. “We’ve been through it. When you’re a likkle youth coming from nothing to something, people a go talk things, but at the end of the day, never mek a rumour be true,” he said. “Me take care of my kids, but sometimes you and the mother have a dispute, and you know how that go. Memba mi deh ya good one time and dem seh Ele have AIDS. Me seh, weh dat come from? Mi nuh dead, mi deh ya. That’s how people is. Me stay strong cause the fittest of the fittest shall live, and God nuh waan no weakness inna Him camp.”

Now 42 years old, he recently completed a European tour and is getting ready for festivals like Reggae Sumfest and Reggae Rotterdam in July. He still assesses the dance circuit and gives kudos to artistes like Ding Dong and Chi Ching Ching for continuing to spread Jamaica’s dance culture.

And for that little kid or music fanatic who happens to stumble across the history books of the entertainer’s life, he hopes to be immortalised as “that hard-working dancehall artiste who took dancehall to that level like the Reggae Boyz. Just like yuh can pick out the footballers who did certain things, when it comes to dancehall, you should be able to pick out Ele in the top five and say he did this or that. I’ve gotten a fair run. Me sell gold, me get Grammy-nominated, me fanbase large, and there is proof to show it.”